RealTime IT News

Intel offers $1.25 million to junior science project winners

There's a lot of smart people
working at Intel, and in addition to making the next generation of chips for our
computers and gadgets, they are trying to encourage the next generation of very
smart people by supporting them through the Intel Science Talent Search (Intel
STS).

 

The
STS first began in 1942 with sponsorship by
Westinghouse. Intel took over the sponsorship in 1998. Dubbed "the junior Nobel
Prize," Intel STS is the oldest and most
prestigious science competition, with up to $1.25 million in scholarships.

 

This year there were 1,602
entrants from 45 states, Puerto Rico and the
Virgin Islands in areas like biochemistry, chemistry,
physics, mathematics, engineering, behavioral science and medicine and health.
The field has been scaled down to 300 semifinalists, who will  receive $1,000 with an additional $1,000 to
their respective school.

 

On Jan. 30, the field will be cut
to 40 finalists, who will be brought to
Washington,
D.C.
for a week-long, all-expenses-paid event
in March. Each finalist will receive at least $5,000 and a new laptop run, while
the top ten finalists will get $100,000 scholarships. They will be announced at
a black-tie banquet on March 11.

 

Black tie? They don't even wear
neckties at IDF���

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