dcsimg
RealTime IT News

Citrix Experiences Large Growth in iBusiness ASP Program

Citrix Systems, Inc yesterday announced the addition of 41 new ASPs from 11 countries to its iBusiness ASP Program.

Citrix Systems. Inc. (CTXS) launched its iBusiness Service Provider Program in September 1999 as the industry's first pay-as-you-go software licensing model for enabling infrastructure software, Citrix MetaFrame, where payment it based on actual usage of concurrent-user licenses.

Just two months later, Citrix announced that 14 ASPs, including AristaSoft Corp., FutureLink, TeleComputing and VeriPoint, joined its ASP Program. In January, 31 new member companies, including IBM Global Services and Corio, joined the Program.

Now seven months after inception, the iBusiness Program has 86 members.

"The quantity and quality of the members represent a worldwide movement of companies that have really committed themselves to the Citrix platform," Daniel Heimlich, director of marketing, said.

Heimlich told ASP-News that this also marks the Program's expansion beyond the U.S. market. "New members include ASPs from Australia, Austria, Canada, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Norway, Singapore, Switzerland and the U.K.," he said.

Heimlich also pointed out that the Program is beginning to see some of the major telecommunication companies emerge. "This represents an opportunity for Citrix, ASP partners and software vendors to reach a much broader and global marketplace," he said.

The telecommunication companies include Cable & Wireless, Cable & Wireless HKT Ltd (Hong Kong) and Telstra.

"The whole move towards ASP is creating a much simpler experience for the user and allowing them access to the most updated programs and software without all the complexity," Heimlich said.

When asked about goals in terms of number of member companies, Heimlich told ASP-News that the focus is less on the number of member companies. "We are more concerned with getting the best ASPs involved," he said. "Citrix doesn't gain revenue from its partners unless they are successful."