RealTime IT News

CollabNet Updates Team Dev System

CollabNet has released an update to CollabNet Enterprise Edition, a team software development system built for geographically distributed programmers.

Version 4.5 "puts a stake in the ground" when it comes to supporting any development system. The platform is open and extensible to other application development tools.

Data is exchanged through SOAP  interfaces, so if you have a different issue-tracking tool or a different CRM  system, data is interchangeable between CollabNet and that system.

Also new in 4.5 is an enhanced project workspace with a wiki-like editor for all project-tracking, portable ALM (application lifecycle management) templates, so all of the information from a project can be copied to another project.

That way, similar projects can reuse templates rather than make new ones from scratch.

Rounding out 4.5 of Enterprise Edition is expanded reporting capabilities that provide more in-depth reporting of the progress of a project. And it allows for queries on the project's status at any level of the CollabNet environment to be sent to any project member.

CollabNet's founder, Brian Behlendorf, is one of the co-developers of the popular Apache open source Web server platform. He started CollabNet in 1999 to create software with the purpose of "figuring out how open source communities work," he told internetnews.com.

That yielded CollabNet Enterprise Edition, a team system for distributed groups of programmers, with features like version control, check in/check out, and message boards, the basics of most team development systems.

Whereas team systems from vendors like Microsoft  and IBM  are tied to their platforms, CollabNet Enterprise Edition is an open source project that works on any platform and with any tools.

"What we're trying to do is distill what made open source work into a bottle and take it to the rest of the industry," said Behlendorf.

"Open source wasn't about a bunch of motivated, passionate hackers who worked late in the night to give away their work.

"It's about finding a better way to distribute work across the Internet, about collaborating with people you might never meet to work together on common needs."