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Audiosoft Enters Rights Management Arena

As the Internet becomes a major arena for music sales and/or piracy, digital rights management and clearinghouse companies are tackling securing music for delivery and defining the rules, once it is sold to the consumer, both for the protection of the recording companies and the artists and songwriters.

Audiosoft, while not a DRM, has introduced a specialized complimentary service that works alongside DRMs to ensure that copyright holders and songwriters worldwide receive royalty payments for music played or downloaded on the Internet. Audiosofts copyright and data reporting system captures, organizes and delivers information about music usage on the Internet, tracking both performing rights and mechanical rights.

It can identify the country of origin of the retailer (that entity making the piece of music available) and the country of origin of the customer. This proprietary feature allows them to have a fully automated and accurate reporting system. And, because they are an independent third party source, Audiosoft can also provide real-time feedback and customized reports for labels, copyright collection societies, online music retailers and audio webcasters to automate the management of copyrights generated on the Internet and provide market feedback and analysis.

Audiosofts data gathering architecture is designed to be compatible with all popular digital music file formats and major industry platforms. In addition, the Audiosofts Rights Management Service is password protected so confidentiality is provided between the reporting database and the copyright collection society.

"The Internet doesnt fully embrace legal aspects of copyright for the purpose of royalty flow payments," commented FX Nuttall, Audiosofts CEO and founder. "The Audiosoft technology brings back the territorial notion of music on the Internet. Without it, labels, copyright societies and artists are left either playing a guessing game regarding international copyright remuneration, or theyre just not getting paid."