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PeopleSoft To Keep Ships in Shape

PeopleSoft Tuesday said it has secured a contract with the U.S. Navy to help it manage the personal files of some 453,000 active duty and reserve members through online portals.

The Pleasanton, Calif.-based Internet business software maker said its Human Capital Management (HCM) platform is especially being used for Navy Standard Integrated Personnel System (NSIPS), a performance review system, which has previously been a manual, paper-based process.

The Navy said it was looking for a completely integrated, personnel system with state of the art self-service capabilities. After a one-month trial period, Commander Susan Eaton, who serves as the NSIPS System and Software Engineering Manager says the Navy's partnership with PeopleSoft is in ship shape.

"Now, rather than filing manual paperwork at their Personnel Support Detachment offices, our service members can update their addresses, phone numbers and emergency contact information from their home, ship or base via a standard Web browser," said Commander Eaton. "It represents a tremendous technological leap in our manpower and personnel systems."

The real-time system also improves service to sailors who can now access their personnel information from 570 ship and shore sites at any time. PeopleSoft says the "self-serve" approach also helps keep errors to a minimum since the Navy members themselves can make sure their personnel data is current.

The task of managing NSIPS is no small feat for IT managers as it is the basis for the consolidation of more than 200 legacy systems. The Navy has used the legacy systems to produce more than 500,000 reports annually, 75,000 of which contain errors that require manual intervention. PeopleSoft says the new system will reduce errors and let the Navy begin gathering data to populate the Defense Department's new Defense Integrated Military Human Resources System (DIMHRS). DIMHRS will consolidate more than 80 legacy systems with PeopleSoft applications and provide service to the 3.1 million active and reserve members of the United States military.

"There is a significant push in Federal and State Governments to consolidate IT systems in order to drive down costs and streamline processes, and the Department of Defense has emerged as a leader in this effort," said PeopleSoft Education and Government managing director Kevin Horigan said in a statement.