RealTime IT News

Transmeta Looks For a Different PC Boom

Low-power chipmaker Transmeta is silently helping to shift the way you access the Web.

In the past few months, the Santa Clara, Calif.-based firm has scored several contracts to put its processors in not only laptops, but also in non-traditional desktop hardware as well as thin clients

Low-power chipmaker Transmeta is silently helping to shift the way you access the Web.

In the past few months, the Santa Clara, Calif.-based firm has scored several contracts to put its processors in not only laptops, but also in non-traditional desktop hardware as well as thin clients , blade PCs, Tablet PCs and what the company calls "Ultra Personal Computers".

Last week alone, Transmeta inked deals to put its new TM8000 Efficeon chip in products made by Hewlett-Packard and Wyse Technology.

HP's deal is a new blade PC running Microsoft Windows XP Pro. The system is expected to debut in the United States and Canada in at the first quarter of 2004. HP is conducting pilot programs in both countries. The Palo Alto, Calif.-based computer and printer maker is using the blade PC as part of its Consolidated Client Infrastructure (CCI). The configuration consists of an HP Thin Client that connects to a network with a secure login to a blade PC with network storage located in a centralized data center.

"The low thermal characteristics of the Transmeta Crusoe processor allow HP to design extremely small enclosures without the need for cooling fans," Transmeta senior vice president of marketing Art Swift.

The two companies have worked before, most notably through their marquee supply deal for HP's Compaq Evo Tablet PCs.

That partnership was extended in September as HP again tapped Transmeta for its Compaq t5300 and t5500 thin clients. The package deal supports recent data from analyst firm IDC: the enterprise thin client market continues to grow at a solid 22.8 percent compounded rate with a forecast of 1.86 million units for 2004 and an expected 3.4 million units to ship in 2007.

Transmeta's traction is staggering considering the chipmaker goes head to head with the likes of Intel with its Pentium 4 Mobile and Centrino chipsets as well as AMD with its Althon XP mobile processors.

But its strategy is aimed at the next sweet spot in the enterprise.

"The adoption rate of non-PC desktops is growing at a rapid pace due to the changing needs of organizations to access server or Internet-based information in a cost-effective way," said IDC research director Bob O'Donnell. "Across almost all business sectors, the server-centric computing model is delivering both business and cost benefits such as increased reliability, advanced remote management and the simplified deployment of new users and software. This benefits organizations by reducing costs, diminishing downtime and ultimately saving businesses millions of dollars in IT spending."

Wyse's deal also speaks to the thin client form factor as the San Jose, Calif.-based manufacturer said it would collaborate with Transmeta to develop Crusoe and Efficeon-based non-PC desktops. server-centric computing.

"The personal computer is clearly no longer the only desktop of choice for information access, as thin clients, handheld PDAs, smart phones and blade PCs all present suitable alternatives depending on an enterprise's needs," Wyse vice president of worldwide marketing George Skaff said.

"Today, CIOs and CTOs understand it is less important where information resides and more important to deliver cost-effective access to the information."

Transmeta is also working to bring a new form factor to market. Known as "Ultra Personal Computers" or "Mobile Computer Core", the wallet-sized CPU and memory device can pop in and out of a dummy terminal on a desktop and then be carried around and accessed like a PDA. The company is working closely with San Francisco-based OQO and Denver-based Antelope Technologies, which is expected to show off its modular computing device at the CES show in Vegas next month. OQO was expected to ship its first round of products back in September, but is only currently taking advance orders.

Intel and AMD are also talking up their versions of a low-power processor for non-PC forms. Intel wrote the book on much of the thin client space and uses its Pentium lineup as its core model. The chipmaking giant has turned to its Centrino technology as its strategy for placement in Tablet PCs by Gateway, Acer and Motion Computing.

AMD's K6-2e and K6-IIIe embedded processors for thin clients, point-of-sale terminals and telecom devices have been out for several years now.

O'Donnell has said that the growth of non-PC adoption is understandable when one considers that the thin client space has a compelling value proposition for the enterprise market and that the devices can be deployed quickly in volume and are easily maintained. , blade PCs, Tablet PCs and what the company calls "Ultra Personal Computers".

Last week alone, Transmeta inked deals to put its new TM8000 Efficeon chip in products made by Hewlett-Packard and Wyse Technology.

HP's deal is a new blade PC running Microsoft Windows XP Pro. The system is expected to debut in the United States and Canada in at the first quarter of 2004. HP is conducting pilot programs in both countries. The Palo Alto, Calif.-based computer and printer maker is using the blade PC as part of its Consolidated Client Infrastructure (CCI). The configuration consists of an HP Thin Client that connects to a network with a secure login to a blade PC with network storage located in a centralized data center.

"The low thermal characteristics of the Transmeta Crusoe processor allow HP to design extremely small enclosures without the need for cooling fans," Transmeta senior vice president of marketing Art Swift.

The two companies have worked before, most notably through their marquee supply deal for HP's Compaq Evo Tablet PCs.

That partnership was extended in September as HP again tapped Transmeta for its Compaq t5300 and t5500 thin clients. The package deal supports recent data from analyst firm IDC: the enterprise thin client market continues to grow at a solid 22.8 percent compounded rate with a forecast of 1.86 million units for 2004 and an expected 3.4 million units to ship in 2007.

Transmeta's traction is staggering considering the chipmaker goes head to head with the likes of Intel with its Pentium 4 Mobile and Centrino chipsets as well as AMD with its Althon XP mobile processors.

But its strategy is aimed at the next sweet spot in the enterprise.

"The adoption rate of non-PC desktops is growing at a rapid pace due to the changing needs of organizations to access server or Internet-based information in a cost-effective way," said IDC research director Bob O'Donnell. "Across almost all business sectors, the server-centric computing model is delivering both business and cost benefits such as increased reliability, advanced remote management and the simplified deployment of new users and software. This benefits organizations by reducing costs, diminishing downtime and ultimately saving businesses millions of dollars in IT spending."

Wyse's deal also speaks to the thin client form factor as the San Jose, Calif.-based manufacturer said it would collaborate with Transmeta to develop Crusoe and Efficeon-based non-PC desktops. server-centric computing.

"The personal computer is clearly no longer the only desktop of choice for information access, as thin clients, handheld PDAs, smart phones and blade PCs all present suitable alternatives depending on an enterprise's needs," Wyse vice president of worldwide marketing George Skaff said.

"Today, CIOs and CTOs understand it is less important where information resides and more important to deliver cost-effective access to the information."

Transmeta is also working to bring a new form factor to market. Known as "Ultra Personal Computers" or "Mobile Computer Core", the wallet-sized CPU and memory device can pop in and out of a dummy terminal on a desktop and then be carried around and accessed like a PDA. The company is working closely with San Francisco-based OQO and Denver-based Antelope Technologies, which is expected to show off its modular computing device at the CES show in Vegas next month. OQO was expected to ship its first round of products back in September, but is only currently taking advance orders.

Intel and AMD are also talking up their versions of a low-power processor for non-PC forms. Intel wrote the book on much of the thin client space and uses its Pentium lineup as its core model. The chipmaking giant has turned to its Centrino technology as its strategy for placement in Tablet PCs by Gateway, Acer and Motion Computing.

AMD's K6-2e and K6-IIIe embedded processors for thin clients, point-of-sale terminals and telecom devices have been out for several years now.

O'Donnell has said that the growth of non-PC adoption is understandable when one considers that the thin client space has a compelling value proposition for the enterprise market and that the devices can be deployed quickly in volume and are easily maintained.