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Is it time for Time Inc. to enter e-reader market?

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Time Inc. wants a slice of the burgeoning e-reader market, though it remains to be seen exactly how the magazine publishing giant will go about it.

After an [internal document was leaked to a news outlet](http://www.nbcbayarea.com/news/tech/Time-Inc-Time-for-a-New-E-Reader-58563707.html), reports circulated speculating that the company may be considering offering an e-reader device by the end of the year.

From the sidelines, it would appear that moving into the nascent market by licensing content or through some other type of content-delivery deal would make sense for the magazine publishing empire. But getting into the hardware aspect of the business? Not so much. It's a daunting challenge, and one that's already being undertaken by stalwarts in the electronics, book publishing and e-commerce industries.

Amazon's Kindle currently rules the e-reader roost, but challengers are jumping into the mix. [Sony's new wireless e-reader](/ec-news/article.php/3836106/Sony+Unveils+3G+EBook+Reader+Library+TieIn.htm) aimed at taking on the Kindle goes on sale this holiday season. Not far behind is Barnes & Noble, which [will debut a wireless e-reader ](/ec-news/article.php/3830966/Barnes++Nobles+Reply+to+Kindle+to+Debut+in+2010.htm)early next year in a partnership with hardware maker Plastic Logic.

Taiwan-based netbook maker [Asus is also considering rolling out two new e-readers](/hardware/article.php/3838086/Asus+Angling+to+Bring+Netbook+Cred+to+Ebooks.htm), one for about $160, that would seriously undercut the competition.

For now, Time Inc. isn't disclosing what approach it will take, though it appears it is keen on licensing the content from its stable of magazines, which includes *Sports Illustrated*, *People* and *Entertainment Weekly*.

"We're speaking with a number of hardware and software companies, as well as other content companies," a Time Inc. spokeswoman told *InternetNews.com*.

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