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RealTime IT News

PacketVideo Sees Bright Future for Wireless Streaming Video

PacketVideo envisions a future for wireless streaming video, and its new technology -- a standards-compliant MPEG-4 software that enables the encoding, decoding and transmission of full motion video over wireless networks -- may fulfill that vision.

PacketVideo has struck deals with more than 35 global media and online companies to trial the delivery of video to wireless devices.

Among the companies working with PacketVideo to explore the streaming of their content over mobile networks are: AtomFilms; Broadband Sports; Columbia Records; E! Entertainment Television Networks; Eveo; FOXSPORTS.com; Gigex.com; GO.com (ABCNEWS.com, Disney Online); Hollywood Records; House of Blues Digital, Inc. (HOB.com); ibidlive.tv ; iCAST.com; Icebox; iFUSE; KLAS-TV; LAUNCH.com; MTV3 (Finland); MUSICBLITZ; Odyssey (a Henson & Hallmark Entertainment Network); Reuters Media; Sony Pictures Digital Entertainment; sputnik7.com; Sundance Channel; Toddlerwatch.co m, Inc.; Traffic411.com; Universal Pictures; VideoGreetings.com; Warner Bros.; weather.com (The Weather ChannelAE Web site); and wildbrain.com.

The technology enables the distribution of video over wireless networks with bit rates as low as 14.4 kbps (which is the rate for networks in the U.S. today) as well as 2.5G and 3.5G networks. The technology is air-interface independent, which means that it works across any type of wireless network, including CDMA, GSM, TDMA, GPRS, and UMTS.

PacketVideo is working with wireless carriers in the U.S. and internationally to trial the technology over their networks. The company has also created alliances with leading device and silicon designers and manufacturers to develop hardware utilizing PacketVideo technology, including: Casio, Compaq, Intel, NEC, SANYO, and Texas Instruments.

"Today, video distribution occurs over terrestrial broadcast, satellite, cable and the Internet," said Jim Carol, co-founder and chairman of PacketVideo. "PacketVideo has created a new distribution avenue called wireless multimedia. Around the world, carriers are upgrading their wireless networks to support wideband digital services, including multimedia."



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