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Sony Launches New Wireless Group

Sony Pictures Digital Entertainment (SPDE) continued its foray into wireless content development today via the launch of a new Wireless Services group within its digital networks division.

SPDE is a unit of Sony Pictures Entertainment that oversees all facets of the company's digital production and maintains and develops Sony's online content, games, and interactive television and wireless content.

Wireless Services will develop and distribute mobile applications based on Sony Pictures Entertainment film and television properties to worldwide wireless carriers and handheld manufacturers.

The group will continue to develop Sony wireless content based on Soap City, Jeopardy, and "Dawson's Creek," which is currently available for mobile devices and personal digital assistants through the Sony USA Channel. There will also be close content synchronization with SPDE Europe to capitalize on the wireless boom in European and Asian markets.

Headed by Tim Chambers and Sony recruit Rio Caraeff, Wireless Services will first set its sights on wireless trailer streaming, Short Messaging Services, Multi-Media Messaging Services, and Sony-themed games for Sony Ericsson Mobile.

"The wireless digital marketplace is clearly in evolution around the world," said Chambers, senior vice president of SPDE Advanced Platforms. "It shows great power now in places like Japan and Europe where wireless content-based businesses are already thriving, and in the U.S. it shows great potential and great motion."

Sony has not yet announced which film and television properties will be spotlighted in new wireless applications other than the recent release of a series of java-enabled mobile games designed for the Sony Ericsson's Z700 color phone based on "Charlie's Angeles" and "Men in Black."

"It is our firm view that in the very near future this marketplace will be a primary way for an increasingly mobile marketplace to access multimedia content, including games, rich messages, and evolving to include even music and video," said Chambers.