Microsoft Launches Preview of MSN Hong Kong

Microsoft Hong Kong has given Hong Kong users a
preview of the
new Microsoft Network (MSN) Hong Kong
portal.

Microsoft claims to be offering extensive local and international content
providers on the Chinese and English versions of MSN Hong Kong including
the South China Morning Post, CNet in Asia, Sing Tao Daily, Sing Tao PC
Market, Next Magazine, Sudden Weekly, EasyFinder, JobFinder, YES!, Rock
Entertainment, Centaline Property, and irasia.com.

Other content providers that are billed to be joining the MSN Hong Kong
site include MTVAsia Online, SCMP Racing Post, IT Asia, Channel Asia,
webnewz, and the Hong Kong Tourist Association.

“We are thrilled to introduce the MSN Hong Kong site and bring the Web
lifestyle closer to customers in Hong Kong with planned new capabilities,
like Chinese-language chat and tools to securely manage personal
information online and support e-commerce,” said Patricia Yee, Hong Kong
business manager, The Microsoft Network.

“Microsoft is committed making Hong Kong a major Internet e-commerce player
by offering secure and user-friendly online tools to organize and utilize
the Internet resources according to personal needs,” added Yee.

Other features of MSN include chat forums in English or Chinese, localized
Hotmail with free Chinese-language support, and the Microsoft Passport
technology, allegedly providing safe, simple-to-use access for information
and electronic commerce transactions.

MSN Hong Kong’s global and local search facilities combine MSN Search with
global and local search partners such as Excite, OpenFind, Goyoyo!, and
Timway Hong Kong Search, providing English or Chinese search capabilities.

“Microsoft is dedicated to expanding the e-commerce services on MSN and
facilitating e-commerce between consumers and businesses,” said Yee. “MSN’s
enhanced services will benefit both consumers and sellers in Hong Kong by
giving them the opportunity to maximize the Web to conduct fast, easy and
safe transactions.”

Microsoft did not comment whether it would provide dial-up Internet access
in Hong Kong which MSN provides to users in the US.

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