Journal, NY Times and Globe Look to Tempt Recruiters

The Wall Street Journal, New York Times and Boston Globe joined forces Wednesday in an effort to make their
respective CareerJournal.com, NYTimes.com and BostonWorks.com Web sites more attractive to recruiters and advertisers attempting to
reach qualified job seekers.

The Help Wanted sections of newspapers, once a cash cow for newspaper publishers, have faced increasingly stiff competition in the
past few years as job seekers began turning to online options like Hotjobs.com and Monster.com. The newspapers fired back with Web
sites of their own, aiming to hold onto their market share.

Wednesday’s move by the three venerable papers to give advertisers the ability to place recruitment ads on all three sites
simultaneously is an attempt to make it easier for advertisers to reach a broad swath of workers in the New York, New Jersey and
Massachusetts markets.


“The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and The Boston Globe attract a complementary audience of executives, managers and
professionals,” said Jyll Holzman, senior vice president of advertising sales for The New York Times. “This alliance enables
companies to locate high-level candidates within our network of strong national and regional brands.”

Peter Newton, president of BostonWorks, added, “The reach of our combined Internet audience is unmatched by other career Web sites.
Between the three sites, we can provide access to a national marketplace of high-quality professionals that are seeking new job
opportunities.”

The deal allows advertisers to use an automated online posting form — powered by CareerCast, the site’s mutual vendor — to place
multiple listings across the sites. It also offers a single billing statement.

“With the help of new technology, we’ve made it easier for human resource professionals to post their recruitment opportunities with
the three of us,” said Tony Lee, editor in chief and general manager of CareerJournal.com. “We look forward to the possibility of
expanding our network beyond the Northeast Corridor in the new year.”

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